All tagged Theologian

Time and Immediacy

Bavinck sets a pretty standard definition for the work of theology: 'The study of God and all things in relation to God.' 'All things' in this definition includes time. This is why Bavinck says that the job of the theologian is to stand outside of history, to ascend 'into the heights of eternity.'

Living Our Theology

Martin Luther once made a provocative statement: We are all called theologians, just as [we are] all [called] Christians. Luther's point is that everything we do speaks to what we believe about God. Our lives show forth who we think the God we worship is like. How do we know God? Does God care for us? Can God be trusted? Is God good? All of these questions are answered in the way we live. We are all called theologians just as we are all called Christians. There is no getting around it, we all do theology.

Modest and Free

Dogmatics show us how God, who is all-sufficient in himself, nevertheless glorifies himself in his creation, which even when it is torn apart by sin, is gathered up again in Christ (Eph 1:10). It describes for us God, always God, from beginning to end — God in his being, God in his creation, God against sin, God in Christ, God breaking down all resistance through the Holy Spirit and guiding the whole of creation back to the objective he decreed for it: the glory of his name. Dogmatics, therefore, is not a dull and arid science. It is a theodicy, a doxology to all God's virtue and perfection, a hymn of adoration and thanksgiving, a 'glory to God in the highest' (Luke 2:14).

The Importance of a Well Educated Clergy

The church today sits at an interesting time in history. We can look around and see culture changing at a rapid pace. Europe has been dechristianized for decades now and though in America we still see high church attendance, the average person in the pew knows neither what the Bible or their theology says. This is not only true of evangelicalism as a whole, but also more narrowly of my particular tradition, Presbyterianism.